This week, Ford announced the acquisition of mobile robotics provider Quantum Signal as part of the factory’s efforts to advance self-driving technology. A new survey finds American consumers still lacking in enthusiasm for less-traditional driving experiences. 
 - Photo courtesy Ford Motor Co.

This week, Ford announced the acquisition of mobile robotics provider Quantum Signal as part of the factory’s efforts to advance self-driving technology. A new survey finds American consumers still lacking in enthusiasm for less-traditional driving experiences.

Photo courtesy Ford Motor Co.

COSTA MESA, Calif. — Consumers lack confidence in the future of self-driving vehicles and their outlook isn’t much better about the influx of battery-electric vehicles that manufacturers are spending billions of dollars to bring to market in the next several years, according to the inaugural J.D. Power 2019 Mobility Confidence Index Study fueled by SurveyMonkey Audience, released today.

The Mobility Confidence Index is 36 (on a 100-point scale) for self-driving vehicles and 55 for battery-electric vehicles.

 “Out of the box, these scores are not encouraging,” said Kristin Kolodge, executive director of Driver Interaction & Human Machine Interface Research at J.D. Power. “As automakers head down the developmental road to self-driving vehicles and greater electrification, it’s important to know if consumers are on the same road — and headed in the same direction. That doesn’t seem to be the case right now. Manufacturers need to learn where consumers are in terms of comprehending and accepting new mobility technologies — and what needs to be done.”

J.D. Power and SurveyMonkey polled 5,749 consumers about self-driving vehicles and 5,270 about battery-electric vehicles. Sentiment was segmented into three categories: low (0–40), neutral (41–60) and positive (61–100).

With an overall score of 36, consumers have a “low” level of confidence about the future of self-driving vehicles. Scoring lowest among the self-driving attributes are: comfort about riding in a self-driving vehicle (34) and comfort about being on the road with others in a self-driving vehicle (35).

Consumers exhibited a “neutral” level of confidence about the future of battery-electric vehicles, which earned an overall Mobility Confidence Score of 55. Attributes scoring lowest include likelihood of purchasing an electric vehicle (39), reliability of electric compared to gas-powered vehicles (49), and ability to stay within budget compared to gas, diesel, or hybrid vehicles (55).

To read the full release, click here.

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