AAA says better design, protocols needed.  -  IMAGE: Getty Images/PhonlamaiPhoto

AAA says better design, protocols needed.

IMAGE: Getty Images/PhonlamaiPhoto

AAA says its research shows automatic emergency braking doesn’t work as it should.

The motor club federation conducted crash tests on the 2022 models of the Chevrolet Equinox LT, Ford Explorer XLT, Honda CR-V Touring and Toyota RAV4 LE.

Though AAA says the crash-prevention technology of AEB has cut down on injuries and fatalities, its current generation doesn’t adequately handle higher speeds or detect moving vehicles in its path at intersections.

“Automatic Emergency Braking does well at tackling the limited task it was designed to do. Unfortunately, that task was drawn up years ago, and regulator’s slow-speed crash standards haven’t evolved,” said Greg Brannon, director of AAA’s automotive engineering and industry relations.

“Testing requirements for this technology, or any vehicle safety system for that matter, must be updated to handle faster, more realistic speeds and scenarios with the greatest safety benefit for drivers.”

AAA tested the technology’s performance on rear-end crashes against stationary vehicles at speeds of 30 miles per hour and 40 miles per hour, plus crashes against moving vehicles at intersections – T-bone and unprotected left-turn collisions. The AEB struggled at higher speeds and failed to detect moving vehicles in its path at intersections, AAA said.

At 30 mph, the technology prevented a rear-end collision for 17 of 20 tests runs. In tests resulting in a crash, the impact speed was reduced by 86%. At 40 mph, though, it prevented a rear-end crash in only six of 20 tests. For tests resulting in a crash, the impact speed was reduced by 62%.

In the T-bone and left-turn tests, crashes happened every time, as the technology failed to alert the driver and slow the vehicle’s speed, AAA reported.

AAA urged carmakers and regulators to zero in on AEB design and test protocols for the kinds of crashes that commonly involve injuries and fatalities.

Originally posted on F&I and Showroom

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